Category: Middle East


We have had several posts related to Islam over the past year and had been asked to compile them into one post so that they would be more accessible to people during the seasons of Ramadan and the Eid. Feel free to connect with us via our Contact Page or find ways to Get Involved as a guest contributor or regional editor.

A Christian Perspective of Eid al-Fitr

For many Christians living in non-Western contexts, Islam is a very present religious community. Outside of homogenous cultures, multi-faith communities share life together in meaningful ways. Through interaction with the religious identity of others, we can come to a fuller understanding of ourselves.

Eid al-Fitr is an Islamic holiday that is a celebration to mark the completion of Ramadan. It is a three-day celebration of purification and thanksgiving for Allah’s strength to complete the preceding month of fasting.

My question is, what can Christians appreciate from this celebration and how can we better understand ourselves in light of it?

Follow for the complete article.

Guidance and Light

This shows an Islamic starburst tile pattern (which traditionally symbolizes the spread of Islam throughout the universe), a lighted lamp and the first half of a verse (5:46) from the Qur’an which states:

Sample Images from “Guidance and Light” by Scott Rayl

“And We (God) sent, following in their footsteps Jesus, the son of Mary, confirming that which was before him in the Torah, and gave him the Gospel, in which there is guidance and light…”

So, in this painting the lamp and the tile pattern both represent the guidance and the light of the Gospel enlightening the world.

Follow for the complete article.

Qur’an Christology?

Adrian Warnock has a post about 11 things Muslims agree with Christians about Jesus. How can  a functioning Christology be made out of this to turn the corner from interfaith dialogue to ecumenical dialogue?

Or, to put the initial question a different way, what differentiates Islam from Christian groups which hesitate in differentiating members of the Trinity (like Unitarians) or hold a low-Christology or elevate their founding teacher’s interpretations on par with other scripture (like Lutherans or Calvinists)?

What roadblocks stand in the way to distinguishing an authentically Islamic Christian Theology?

Follow for the complete article.

Challenging Islamophobia – A Christian Duty

In this article, Ray Gaston of Birmingham, UK argues for a radical interpretation and implementation of 1 Corinthians 13 in response to Islamophobia in the West.

…I want to present not an analysis or apology for Islam, I leave that to Muslims themselves, neither will this be a potted description of the practices of Islam for Christians. (There are other good resources for Christians to find out about Islam and to find out about the particular communities of Muslims that reside in the UK.) Instead I want to argue for a Christian praxis within this context of rising Islamophobia and anti-Muslim hate crime. This praxis is founded upon two sources – one Islamic and the other Christian – that seek to generate a two-fold agenda for Christians in relation to Islam and Muslims. Firstly, founded upon an Islamic story about the first recorded encounter between Muslims and Christians, the priority for Christians is to seek to build the trust of Muslims. Secondly, rooted in the Pauline understanding of the practice of love, a call to self examine the hatred and fear in our own hearts and as a counter-cultural practice, actively to seek, through a dialogical spirituality, what is good in Islam, thus subverting the barrage of negative portrayals of Islam and Muslims in the media.

Follow for the complete article.

Adrian Warnock has a post about 11 things Muslims agree with Christians about Jesus. How can  a functioning Christology be made out of this to turn the corner from interfaith dialogue to ecumenical dialogue? Continue reading

globaltheologyadmin:

A quick thought from a friend about the significance of non-Europeans in the foundation of continental theology. He hits the nail on the head that theological reflection is not restricted to Europeans and provides the opening of a larger conversation about how contemporary non-Western theologians can be more adequately incorporated into the life of the church.

Originally posted on Job and the Storm:

Some (small) food for thought:

Much of orthodox Christian theology owes its success to the work of African and Asia-minor thinkers. Regarding the former, one need look no further than the North African theologians. Augustine, Tertullian and Cyprian are just a handful (and what a handful!). One could also throw in there for good measure Origen (from Alexandria, Egypt) and Athanasius (Also Egyptian. Fun fact: he was derisively nick-named the “black dwarf” because of his physical appearance). And the Asia-minor thinkers? Look no further than the Cappadocian Fathers (Basil the Great, Gregory of Nyssa, and Gregory of Nanzianzus), residents of what is now Turkey and undisputably important theologians.

All of the thinkers mentioned above are powerhouses who contributed enormously both to Orthodox theology and Western thought generally. And none of them are European. Before Barth, Tillich, Multmann, etc. there were the African and Asian thinkers who laid the foundation for…

View original 107 more words

Foundation University is sponsoring a new scholarly journal project called the Journal of Global Theology. See below for information about the inaugural volume :

Global theology in the internet era: an examination of the importance of the internet as a tool for the promulgation of Christian theology

The Journal of Global Theology (Foundation University) seeks to provide insight into the study of Christian Theology from a decidedly Global perspective. We offer readers an opportunity to view theology from various viewpoints while at the same time maintaining both an orthodox Christian viewpoint and an openness to differing Christian traditions. We seek contributions from every corner of the globe and encourage especially contributions from Asia, the Pacific Rim, the African continent, and the Middle East. Nonetheless, contributions from North and South America and Europe are also welcome.

Journal of Global Theology is aiming to promote scholarly discussions, contributions and dialogue in the following fields:

  1. •Contextual Theology
  2. •Intercultural Theology
  3. •Inter-religious Dialogue
  4. •Theology and Internet
  5. •Peace and Justice

The Journal of Global Theology accepts submissions in English, French, German, and Spanish.

If you would like to contribute, please send your essay to our Editor, Dr. Jim West, at drjewest@gmail.com and note in the subject line ‘submission for the Journal of Global Theology’. All submissions will be subjected to ‘blind peer review’ and those accepted will be notified accordingly.

Walid Saleh, a professor of religious studies at the University of Toronto, has been researching the historical significance of Arabic-language Bibles and the interaction with Islamic writings in the medieval period.

One area of his research that Saleh finds especially intriguing: many 19th-century Arab novelists and poets were strongly influenced by these Biblical texts. As he explores the literary and liturgical interplay between the Bible and Arabic thought, Saleh has unearthed hitherto unknown intellectual and spiritual connections between these great cultures. As he observes, “This is a long and complicated story that’s not represented by our current political environment.”

This short article details some of Saleh’s research and we will look forward to finding more examples the dynamic influence between language and culture in forming religious expression.

Mark Roncace is seeking contributors for two volumes, Global Perspectives on the Old Testament and Global Perspectives on the New Testament. Pearson Prentice Hall is publishing Global Perspectives on the Bible this year. Next, separate OT and NT volumes, also to be published by Prentice Hall, will be produced. Both books will feature much of the same material as the original Bible volume, but with added essays.

The books—designed as entry level college textbooks—gather four different essays around one biblical text. The essays are brief (about 1,000 words and need not be “scholarly”) and articulate insights from a particular geographical, social, cultural, economic, religious, or ideological context/location. Here is the list of texts/books for which he need essays.

  • Genesis 6-9
  • Numbers 22-24
  • Leviticus
  • Judges
  • 1-2 Kings
  • Jeremiah
  • Ezekiel 1-25
  • Esther
  • Ecclesiastes
  • Daniel
  • Crucifixion narratives
  • Acts (other than chapter 2)
  • Corinthians
  • Galatians
  • 1-2 Thessalonians
  • James
  • Pastorals (1-2 Timothy, Titus)
  • 1-3 John
  • 1-2 Peter

Please let Mark know if you are interested (mroncace@wingate.edu) in writing an essay on one (or two) of these texts and he will forward specific guidelines and a sample. In addition to scholars, Mark is particularly interested in gathering perspectives from non-professional readers. He is trying to run on a tight schedule: final OT essays are due April 1 and final NT essays are due June 1 (but remember they are only about 1,000 words).

Guidance and Light

This shows an Islamic starburst tile pattern (which traditionally symbolizes the spread of Islam throughout the universe), a lighted lamp and the first half of a verse (5:46) from the Qur’an which states:

Sample Images from "Guidance and Light" by Scott Rayl

“And We (God) sent, following in their footsteps Jesus, the son of Mary, confirming that which was before him in the Torah, and gave him the Gospel, in which there is guidance and light…” Continue reading

In this article, Ray Gaston of Birmingham, UK argues for a radical interpretation and implementation of 1 Corinthians 13 in response to Islamophobia in the West.

…I want to present not an analysis or apology for Islam, I leave that to Muslims themselves, neither will this be a potted description of the practices of Islam for Christians. (There are other good resources for Christians to find out about Islam and to find out about the particular communities of Muslims that reside in the UK.) Instead I want to argue for a Christian praxis within this context of rising Islamophobia and anti-Muslim hate crime. This praxis is founded upon two sources – one Islamic and the other Christian Continue reading

As we approach a well-known season in many churches liturgical calendars, we are starting a blog series focusing on different perspectives of characters in the Christmas story, holiday practices, and advent themes.

African Christmas: A Wise Man Sees a Star in the East

We are requesting submissions of pieces, 500-1500 words expressing the significance of Christmas or Advent within a distinct cultural perspective.

We request posts from primary sources serving in a Non-Western context as well as secondary sources with the ability to give voice to another perspective.

Some possible prompts:

Which characters of the story appear in your context? (shepherds, wise men, travelers, etc.)

What significant elements are present in your church to prepare for or celebrate the holiday?

Which scriptures are most meaningful for your community to understand the incarnation of Christ, and why?

What sermons are written in this time of year for your community?

By sharing together our perspectives of the holiday, we look forward to hearing a familiar story with fresh ears and seeing the advent of God in Christ with new eyes, initiating a kingdom that brings all people together as the children of God.

Please see our Write Page for information about contributing.

Questions or submissions can be directed by email to submissions.globaltheology@gmail.com

Christmas is all about a migration story.  I am not referring to Santa’s Christmas Eve sleigh ride around the world—that’s travel, not migration—and it’s also not what Christmas is all about.

Even Jesus, Mary, and Joseph’s escape as refugees to Egypt just after the visit of the Magi—while certainly a formative experience in young Jesus’ life and an experience upon which we would do well to reflect upon—is not at the very center of the Christmas story. Continue reading

Weekend Roundup is a quick link to articles covering an array of subjects related to Global Theology. This week, we have articles on Christmas! African celebrations, peace in Palestine, and the Christmas tree in abolitionist movements. Continue reading

For many Christians living in non-Western contexts, Islam is a very present religious community. Outside of homogenous cultures, multi-faith communities share life together in meaningful ways. Through interaction with the religious identity of others, we can come to a fuller understanding of ourselves.

Eid al-Fitr is an Islamic holiday that is a celebration to mark the completion of Ramadan. It is a three-day celebration of purification and thanksgiving for Allah’s strength to complete the preceding month of fasting.

My question is, what can Christians appreciate from this celebration and how can we better understand ourselves in light of it? Continue reading

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